W7MCM's AMATEUR RADIO WEBSITE

Serving ALL of the HAM Community

QST QST QST

QST QST QST  NEW REPEATER W7GSN 146.740 DCS tone 25 - Dyer Hill Repeater Group!!

MULTI ROTOR UAV COPTER INTEREST!!! 

I have started a new web site for my new interest Radio Controlled Multirotors/Drones and here is the link to it:

 http://hobbymultirotors.webs.com/

there is also a page here for now and also a thread on the forums here but will mainly have everything , links etc over on the new  web site. please come check it out and also check this  page here on drones

Starting December 11, 2012

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HamCall.net Callsign Lookup:

QRZ callsign lookup:
Callsign lookups provided by qrz.com

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Local news and events

 There is a new forum that WB6WUI started in the Methow Valley, follow this link

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR THE Okanogan County Amateur Radio Club WEB SITE CLICK ON THIS LINK and check them out on QRZ and also the only club in Okanogan County with a  facebook page!  click on this link to get to the Clubs FACEBOOK page

 As a ham radio operator, you know your services are at times needed by the FCC. That's why it's important to quickly update your contact information, including your address, as it changes. The FCC makes this quick and painless for amateur radio operators, offering two convenient methods to change your address. The quickest method is using the FCC's online system, but you can also change your address by mail (or in person). for detailed instructions go to the FAQ here on this web site!!!

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION 

The Romance of DX

The Romance of DX

By Rob Gregory KD7H

Many of the new members of the club who are also relatively new to the ranks of amateur radio may have had their interest in “DX” sparked by some of the banter heard on the HF bands or on the local repeater. Some of you may have been puzzled or even, heaven-forbid, turned-off by the idea of working DX because it has sounded too difficult, strange, mysterious, or downright impossible because, perhaps, you may believe it requires vast, secret knowledge, the latest state-of-the-art DSP transceiver, stacked arrays of mono-band Yagis and an auto-tune amplifier. Perhaps newcomers wonder if DXers meet at midnight during a full moon in the local cemetery to discuss DX secrets.

However, you may be interested in DX because it actually sounds like fun, foreign countries interest you, or you marvel at how your voice can be converted to radio frequency energy, travel at the speed of light hundreds of miles into the upper atmosphere, refract downward, and, after a few hops, land on a remote point on the planet. It’s wonderful, isn’t it? All that can add to the romance—and adventure—of DX: the adventure of contacting distant places and interesting cultures......To read more from Rob KD7H go to the forum here for more.......

 

 

Amateur Radio

About Amateur Radio

Ham radio, as it is often called, is a hobby. It is a non-commercial radio communication service whose primary aims are public service, technical training, experimenting with radio electronics, and leisure communication between private persons. Hams are noted for providing communications in times of emergency or disaster. Ham radio exists in nearly every country and on the same frequencies. This allows amateur radio operators to communicate internationally. Amateur Radio is governed by the Federal Communications Commission and by Part 97 of the Title 47 Telecommunications regulations.

By international treaty, the amateur and amateur-satellite services are for qualified persons of any age who are interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without pecuniary interest. In areas where the services are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission, an amateur operator must hold an FCC or Canadian license or be a foreign-licensed amateur whose country has entered into a reciprocal licensing/operating arrangement with the United States or who holds a CEPT or IARP license.

What can I do with a Ham License?

There are so many things, it's a difficult question to answer, but here's some ideas:

  • Talk to people in foreign countries. DX'ing is a favorite of many hams!
  • Talk to people (both local and far away) on your drive to work
  • Help in emergencies and natural disasters by providing communications.
  • Provide communications in parades or walkathons and other public service events.
  • Help other people become hams. (We call it "Elmering.")
  • Hook your computer to your radio and communicate "computer-to-computer." Hams use radio modems. --read more.....

READ MORE ABOUT THIS AND MUCH MORE IN THE HAM RADIO SECTION ON THIS WEB SITE HERE

where did Ham come from

Do you know the origin of --Ham??
"Ham: a poor operator. A 'plug.'"

That's the definition of the word given in G. M. Dodge's The Telegraph Instructor even before radio. The definition has never changed in wire telegraphy. The first wireless operators were landline telegraphers who left their offices to go to sea or to man the coastal stations. They brought with them their language and much of the tradition of their older profession.

In those early days, spark was king and every station occupied the same wavelength-or, more accurately perhaps, every station occupied the whole spectrum with its broad spark signal. Government stations, ships, coastal stations and the increasingly numerous amateur operators all competed for time and signal supremacy in each other's receivers. Many of the amateur stations were very powerful. Two amateurs, working each other across town, could effectively jam all the other operations in the area. When this happened, frustrated commercial operators would call the ship whose weaker signals had been blotted out by amateurs and say "SRI OM THOSE #&$!@ HAMS ARE JAMMING YOU."

Amateurs, possibly unfamiliar with the real meaning of the term, picked it up and applied it to themselves in true "Yankee Doodle" fashion and wore it with pride. As the years advanced, the original meaning has completely disappeared.

-Louise Ramsey Moreau W3WRE/WB6BBO

for more check this link:  http://www.arrl.org/ham-radio-history

 I put this on this site a long time ago and it still holds true, It is timeless information:

HOW TO SOUND LIKE A LID:

THE DO NOTS OF A HAM OPERATOR:

by Rusty Bumpers N4LID

On two meters lately, I have noticed a tendency of people making a concerted effort to sound like a LID (operator, read: IDIOT).i.e. poor  Since this seems to be the new style in amateur radio, I thought I would present this handy guide to radio nerd-dom. The following is what I call "How to sound like a LID in one easy lesson".

1. Use as many Q signals as possible. Yes I know they were invented solely for CW and are totally inappropriate for two-meter FM (or any voice mode), but they are fun and entertaining. They keep people guessing as to what you really meant. i.e. "I'm going to QSY to the kitchen." can you really change frequency to the kitchen? QSL used to mean "I am acknowledging receipt", but now it appears to mean "yes" or "OK." I guess I missed it when the ARRL changed the meaning.

2. Never laugh, when you can say "HI HI!." No one will ever know that you aren't a long time CW ragchewer if you don't tell them. They'll think you've been on since the days of Marconi. Why not simply laugh? IE: Ha Ha... etc. What a concept!

3. Utilize an alternative vocabulary. Use worked like "destinated" and "negatory." Its OK to make up words here. "yea Bill, I pheelbart zaphonix occasionally myself".

 

FORUM

THE FORUM IS OPEN TO ALL AND I WELCOME EVERY ONE TO CHECK IT OUT AND USE IT. THERE IS ALOT OF INFORMATION THERE.PLEASE ADD MORE!

eqsl

Enter your callsign to see if you have an eQSL waiting!

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 QHT- a GREAT place for Ham gear

starting 4-25-2011

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visits since Aug.20,2011

Upcoming Events

Wednesday, Oct 18 at 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Wednesday, Nov 15 at 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Wednesday, Dec 20 at 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Wednesday, Jan 17 at 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS

NEW REPEATER!! UNDER AN OLD CALL W7GSN 146.740 - OFFSET AND DCS TONE OF 25

OWNED AND  CONTROLLED BY THE  NEW DYER HILL REPEATER GROUP!!! OPEN TO ALL LICENSED AMATEURS.. WE  GOOD ON QRZ


The Okanogan County Amateur Radio club is sponsoring  testing sessions at the Omak Libray  30 S. Ash Street in Omak  walk-ins welcome. Get your first license or up grade.. The contact person is Mike W7MCM at 509 449 0605 or email w7orc1@gmail.com  get ahold of us if you want to test and if we do not have one scheduled we will schedule one just for you and it will be 20 to 30 days from the time you request it...

JUST SO YOU KNOW:

Do you know what kerchunking is? Will it help if I tell you it's usually used as a verb? I don't think you will find it on any of the FCC tests. Kerchunking means to key your mic and listen for the repeater tone without saying anything. Usually people kerchunk to check that the repeater is working or that they have programmed their radio correctly. The problem with that is that the FCC considers kerchunking to be transmitting and transmitting without ID'ing is against the rules. So please remember to ID with your call sign anytime you trigger the repeater. The official rules are - ID at the end of your transmission and/or every ten minutes. Please ID (say your call sign) at the end of each transmission.

OVER 14,240 VISITS as of Aug 31,2014 TO THIS WEB SITE SINCE AUG 2011 WOW THANKS TO EVERY ONE!!!

You do not need to be a member of this web site to enjoy most all of it. Please feel free to check it out and if you wish leave a mark in the guest book, Thanks

If you wish to become a member of this web site you need to sign-up and give me your name and email address and Call if you have one and I will check it out. Thanks Contact me at w7mcm@arrl.net

The ham fests and flea markets are starting again and I have updated the HAMFEST page and I will try to keep the current ones on top.

  If you or your Club want any thing listed on the calender or you wish to have any announcements posted on this Website, please contact us. We welcome all Amateur Radio Clubs.

The Okanogan Amateur Radio Club is now listed on the www.hamdepot.com  Washington State directory. Check it out here.

Check out the Calender, it also has a map option!

  Site  Members can upload pictures and start your own album in the gallery, please feel free to add some and check out others.    Also members have posted some of their favorite QSL cards. Keep them coming! 

   If you need any words or phrases translated from one language to another go to Gadgets and Fun Stuff on this web site for a free translater, it really works well.

If you are interested in Digital Communications, and need an interface for  your radio, Tigertronics in Oregon has very good prices on Signalink, check it out,  and I have added more information on our web site here!! 

 I have updated the new page here QSL and Paper Chasing

WILLIAM J. PLUM

Airmail Postage & DX Supplies

12 Glenn Road

Flemington, NJ 08822-3322

Tel. (908) 788-1020 10am-4pm ET M-F

Fax (908) 782-2612

plumdx@msn.com  

 

Here is the W7ORC clubs new email w7orc1@gmail.com use it to contact the CLUB, about anything reguarding the Club

   If you fish check out my other web site-http/maukfishingstuff.com/ AND WWW.FISHINGTACKLECOVERS.COM

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